Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Judy Mosley

 

Life is full of challenges.  All of us have, at one point or another, decided how we are going to live our lives.  Itʼs the journey that everyone makes.  But, it can be difficult to do when there arenʼt many people around us to model our lives after.  

 

Still, we push forward.  We lose 50 lbs., learn to organize our home, develop healthy relationships, or we find our dream job.  Weʼve conquered the various mountains that have stood in our path.  Yet, after the fact, we might feel reaching our goal is anticlimactic or even feel at a loss.  

 

What now?  Whatʼs next, now that weʼve achieved what weʼve set out to do?  Wasnʼt mastering the challenge the point?  Or, is there life afterwards that we hadnʼt thought of? Read More »

Posted on 20 November, 2008 in Balance, Fitness & Health, Goals, Happiness, Helping Others
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Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Jennifer Snelling

 

You probably do it all year and don’t even think about it.  If you don’t, you’re starting to think about it now.  The holidays are that time of year when a magnifying glass is held over our lives, our financial status, and our generosity.  Often, it isn’t just the fact that we’re expected to give at this time of year – that many of us are shopping for gifts, being asked to help with fundraisers, or hearing those Salvation Army bells tolling on the corner – but also that we, for some reason, feel compelled to do something to participate in the general warmth of the season.  In fact, it can be very depressing when we feel apart from it.

 

There are all kinds of ways to give, and they don’t necessarily have to be monetary.  Here are seven simple and inexpensive ways to make you feel like you’ve helped someone or improved the world, without traveling to exotic places or spending a lot of money. Read More »

Posted on 19 November, 2008 in Gratitude, Helping Others, Making the Day Count
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Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Tamara Belinc

 

Bill Morgan believes you should walk through life with a smile on your face, a prayer in your heart and outstretched hands to help those in need.  When Bill believes in something, he acts on it.

 

Growing upon a cotton farm in Anniston, Ala., Bill, 64, suffered from rheumatic fever and was paralyzed for a time. “I know what it’s like to be left out,” he said, “so I made it my goal to be sure that no boy is left out that I can help.”  With that goal in mind, he has been the Past Master of the Masonic Orders and also the past president of his local Shriner’s chapter. He also served as an ambassador. “I’ve taken kids and their parents to Nashville to catch a bus to go the Shriner’s hospital,” he said. Read More »

Posted on 19 November, 2008 in Gratitude, Happiness, Helping Others, Inspirational Stories
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Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Judy Mosley

 

It’s a simple signal – a little growl in the stomach or the sudden urge for “something.”  Human beings are superior for knowing when we are hungry.  Even if we aren’t exactly starving, we will snack as much as possible to keep hunger at bay.

 

There is another part of us that needs just as much attention.  It can’t be seen on an x-ray or an ultrasound, but it’s still an important part of who we are.  We’ve all felt its’ many signals … from unwarranted anger, the loneliness that creeps in while we’re in a crowded room, to the feeling inside when we have nothing left to give to those around us, just to name a few.

 

It’s our soul speaking to us in different ways, and it’s telling us it’s hungry. Read More »

Posted on 18 November, 2008 in Balance, Fitness & Health, Gratitude, Happiness, Making the Day Count, Spirituality
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Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Jennifer Snelling

 

What are you usually looking at when someone is talking to you?  Take a moment to think about it.  For me, it is the computer or television screen, the scenes passing outside the car window, or whatever project or task I’m taking care of at the moment.  I’m often distracted and answer with a simple, “Uh-huh,” or a quick, half-thought response so that I can continue to participate in the conversation without being distracted from whatever I’m involved in.

 

Not giving your attention to a conversation can have consequences.  Often, you’ll forget important parts of the conversation later on, have miscommunications, arguments, or even come across as not caring to friends and those you love.  The consequences can be equally as damaging in the workplace.

 

Surely you’ve been in the position of the speaker.  What does it feel like to have something important to communicate or a valid question to ask?  What does it feel like when they respond with an answer that doesn’t help or a comment that communicates that they have more important things to worry about?  Not good.

 

I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to be that person.  Read More »

Posted on 18 November, 2008 in Balance, Finance & Family, Productivity
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