Editor’s Note: Make the Days Count is republishing its top 10 articles for the benefit of new readers.  This article was first run on November 14, 2008.   Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Jennifer Snelling

 

Have you ever had the overwhelming feeling that not only is there not enough hours of the day, but that you’ll never in your life be able to accomplish all the designs you have in mind?  Sometimes it seems there are so many things to do and remember that a task or goal that seems important one day only to fall by the way for days or even years at a time.

 

For those of us that have many day-to-day responsibilities to fulfill – not to mention accomplishing our short- and long-term goals, it can be hard to stay on track.  How can we avoid losing our concentration on our aspirations while still focusing on the matters at hand?  How do we keep from feeling completely overwhelmed with it all?

 

There are three pieces of advice that have stuck in my mind over the years.  They are three very simple things from very simple sources, yet good solid advice for making life more manageable. Read More »

Posted on 31 March, 2009 in Goals, Productivity
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Editor’s Note: Make the Days Count is republishing its top 10 articles for the benefit of new readers.  This article was first run on November 22, 2008.

Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Judy Mosley

 

“I am worthy and deserving of a good life.”

“I am responsible for my life.”

“I am responsible for my own spiritual growth.”

 

Each of these are affirmative statements, or affirmations.  Affirmations can be about health, love, respect, God … anything that you want to affirm within yourself.  They send powerful messages deep into our minds.  Written purposefully and said regularly, these statements penetrate levels of our psyche that typically seem to be out of reach, operating beyond our conscious control. Read More »

Posted on 30 March, 2009 in Balance, Goals, Happiness, Making the Day Count, Motivation, Productivity
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Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Jennifer Snelling

 

Most people make ambitious plans for the New Year including the old standards like getting healthy, organized, or improving themselves as a person.  As the New Year comes in and we’re focusing on our enthusiastic new goals for our lives, it’s easy to forget about the little things that could immediately make our days go smoothly and, in turn, make it more convenient to attain even our loftiest aspirations. 

 

It’s the one thing that could help us all – goals or not – more time.

 

Here are ten easy time-saving tips I’ve picked up that bring more convenience and ease to life. Read More »

Posted on 11 January, 2009 in Balance, Goals, Productivity
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Article by Make The Days Count Contributor Marie Monroe

 

The word “multi-tasking” has become a common verb in our world.  It reflects an experience now well known to most of us.  We usually take pride in our ability to multi-task and many times, the word itself carries a decidedly positive tone.

 

It describes how we are on top of our game, how efficient, how important, how skilled or how clever we are.  It is also a powerful interpersonal boundary. It will stop our colleagues in their tracks when we say, “I am multi-tasking right now.”  Our loved ones, and even strangers, will also pause.

 

Not exactly a polite way to communicate, but effective and efficient.  Having had this experience themselves, people know how consumed we are at that moment and how intensely we have to concentrate in order to continue our tasks.  They also know that we are at maximum speed and capacity – that we can’t handle more at the moment. Read More »

Posted on 18 December, 2008 in Goals, Productivity, Simplify
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This is the First in a Series of Articles on Motivation

By Make The Days Count Contributor Philip Wood

 

Midway through my final year at DePaul University, a recruiting banquet was held at the Chicago Athletic Club for the survivors in the honors accounting program.  For those of us not headed immediately to graduate school, the fete was the culmination of our academic careers. 

Four years prior, dozens of students entered the program.  A brutal attrition rate, however, reduced our number ninety percent by the time the recruiting banquet was held.  The survivors were the guests of honor at the banquet, there to be wined and dined by recruiters from the then Big 8 public accounting firms and other major local corporations. 

Attending the University on an academic scholarship and achieving near perfect grades to date, I believed myself to be at the top of the program.  Blindly arrogant, I expected that I would be the center of attention. Read More »

Posted on 18 December, 2008 in Career, Motivation, Productivity
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